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“Takeaway: Network address translation (NAT) has become one of the key components of today’s corporate networks attached to the Internet. See how to set up and manage NAT using the Cisco Internetwork operating system.

Network address translation (NAT) is one of those rare information technology buzzwords that does exactly what its name implies. In this case, it translates one network address into another network address. The most popular use for NAT is to connect an internal network to the Internet. The proliferation of hosts that now connects to the Internet is causing a shortage of IP addresses, so NAT is a key tool for connecting corporate networks using private IP addresses to the Internet. Since Cisco provides the bulk of the routers that connects to the Internet, we’re going to show you how to set up NAT using the Cisco Internetwork Operating System (IOS).

Understanding NAT
Using NAT to connect to the Internet allows you to:

  • Use only one public, registered IP address for Internet access for many thousands of private IP addresses at your site.
  • Change Internet service providers (ISPs) easily, without readdressing the majority of hosts on your network.
  • Hide the identity of hosts on your local network behind the single public IP address to keep outside hosts from easily targeting them.

The most difficult part of using NAT in the Cisco IOS is getting a handle on these four key terms:

  • Inside Local—This is the local IP address of the private host on your network (i.e., your PC’s IP address).
  • Inside Global—This is the public, legal, registered IP address that the outside network sees as the IP address of your local host.
  • Outside Local—This is the local IP address from the private network, which your local host sees as the IP address of the remote host.
  • Outside Global—This is the public, legal, registered IP address of the remote host (i.e., the IP address of the remote Web server that your PC is connecting to).”

You can read the rest of the article here Set up NAT using the Cisco IOS

Comments

One Response to “A Nice Easy Breakdown of Cisco NAT”

  1. cisco waas price on December 16th, 2008 8:06 am

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